Keyboard In Acetone


Keyboard In Acetone

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About the Author: livescience

64 Comments

  1. I had to prise my mouse apart recently to clear some gunk out of a button microswitch. got it all working fine, back together, then had to glue the slidey pads back that covered up a couple of screws. Was working like brand new.

    then I cleaned a tiny bit of excess glue off with some acetone and 10 minutes later threw it in the bin.

  2. I doubly approve of this image:

    1.) C̶h̶e̶m̶i̶c̶a̶l̶ reactions are cool

    2.) That right there is one of the worst keyboards ever conceived and it deserves nothing less than a bath of a̶c̶i̶d̶

  3. I used to work in laboratory and most of the keyboards had at least a few deformed keys due to stuff like this. Sometimes they’d get so bad the keys would “melt” themselves stuck. Acetonitrile (methyl cyanide) was the biggest culprit.

  4. How many keyboards would it take before there’s not enough acetone left to melt any more keyboards?

  5. Oooh, I did this once! By accident.. I was using nail polish remover, and the bottle spilled. It got onto my land line handset, and the thing tried to literally melt onto my skin. Instantly got thrown away, and I had plastic residue on my skin for days.

    0/10 do not recommend, smells horrid.

  6. I use quite a bit of acetone in my lab. Not long ago I spilled some on my calculator, and now the buttons won’t press down as they are melted together

  7. If you were to evaporate off the acetone, could you use the polymer or has it been chemically altered by the acetone?

  8. I’ve always wondered how bad is acetone on your skin.

    I got on my hands a couple times washing glass in the lab. I assume nothing bad considering my hands are ok.

  9. This is why I find it hard to believe when someone tells me they couldn’t get floor adhesive off their floors with acetone. Look how powerful this shit is!

  10. I once tried to clean my plastic labglasses with acetone, I no longer have any and now posses a grave danger to my own eyes

  11. Me not realizing what acetone is: “Oh cool! Is this an easy way to clean…my……keyboard… Oh.”

  12. This happens because acetone molecules are nonpolar, so they are symmetrically shaped and have an equal distribution of charge. Water is polar, and so is sugar, for example. Polar molecules dissolve other polar molecules. Since acetone is nonpolar, it can dissolve nonpolar molecules, such as those making up the majority of the keyboard.

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