NASA and NOAA satellites track Alberto in the US south


IMAGE

IMAGE: NASA’s Aqua satellite recorded an infrared picture of Subtropical Depression Alberto on May 29 at 4: 15 a.m. EDT (0815 UTC) revealed greatest storms in 3 locations circling around Alberto’s low-level center …view more 

Credit: Credits: NASA/ NRL

OnTuesday, May 29, 2018, the National Hurricane Center provided the last public advisory onAlberto NASA and NOAA satellites continued to supply images that revealed the level and strength of the storm in the southern U.S. Alberto has actually deteriorated to a subtropical anxiety. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite recorded an infrared picture of Subtropical Depression Alberto on May 29 at 4: 15 a.m. EDT (0815 UTC) revealed greatest storms in 3 locations circling around Alberto’s low-level center. The most effective thunderstorms had cloud leading temperature levels as cold as or cooler than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53 degrees Celsius). Storms with cloud leading temperature levels that cold have the ability to produce heavy rains. That heavy rains is an issue and becomes part of the caution from the National Hurricane Center (NHC).

NHC forecasters stated that Alberto is anticipated to produce 2 to 6 inches of rain from Alabama northward into the southern Great Lakes and from north Florida into the southern Appalachians throughThursday Isolated optimum storm overalls of 12 inches are possible over the Florida Panhandle andAlabama These rains might produce flooding and flash flooding.

NOAA’s GOES-East satellite offered a morning noticeable image of Alberto moving into the TennesseeValley The images revealed that the center was over Alabama and effective thunderstorms circled around the center extending into easternMississippi Western Mississippi was clear of clouds from Alberto in an image handled May 29 at 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC). The bulk of Alberto’s clouds and storms extended from the northern to eastern and southern quadrants, blanketing Alabama, Georgia, the Carolinas, Tennessee and Kentucky.

The NHC kept in mind at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on May 29, the center of Subtropical Depression Alberto lay near latitude 32.3 degrees north and longitude 86.8 degrees west. That’s simply 30 miles (45 km) west of Montgomery,Alabama The anxiety was approaching the north-northwest near 13 miles per hour (20 kph). Maximum continual winds were near 30 miles per hour (45 kph) and continued weakening is anticipated as Alberto moves further inland. The approximated minimum main pressure is 995 millibars.

TheNational Weather Service Weather Prediction Center kept in mind on Tuesday, May 29, 2018, “Alberto weakened to a subtropical depression on Mon. night. However, heavy rainfall from Alberto will spread into northern Georgia, the western Carolinas, and Tennessee on Tuesday, increasing the threat of flash flooding in those areas. Flash Flood Watches are in effect for a large swath of the South, and even as far north as the Ohio River Valley and central Appalachians.”

The system is anticipated to deteriorate into a residue low by Tuesday night.

###

For upgraded projections on Alberto, go to: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

Disclaimer: We can make errors too. Have a good day.

Recommended For You

About the Author: livescience

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *