Copper isn’t magnetic but creates resistance in the presence of a strong magnetic field


Copperisn’t magnetic but creates resistance in the presence of a strong magnetic field


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About the Author: livescience

17 Comments

  1. Since no one has given an explanation yet, I’ll step up.

    If the magnet sits still next to the copper, nothing interesting happens. If the magnetic field is changing, however, it induces a current in the copper. These are called ‘eddy currents.’ Ever heard of an electromagnet? When you run current though a wire, it generates a magnetic field. These eddy currents do the same and just happen to generate a strong enough magnetic field to perfectly cancel the momentum of the magnet, dissipating its energy into ohmic heating of the copper. Mother Nature is truly beautiful when it comes to electromagnetism.

  2. _Resistance_, without further explanation, is perhaps an unfortunate choice of word, as it might sound as if you’re talking about the electrical resistance.

  3. In a moving strong magnetic field.

    You need moving magnetic fields to induce eddy currents, which produce counter-acting magnetic fields.

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