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About the Author: livescience

64 Comments

  1. Total dumbass question; is it safe and possible to do these at home?

    EDIT: best answer is to read the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet)

    EDIT 2: look for colour flames / salts on Amazon

  2. At least 2 of these are salts, one of them being table salt (NaCl). How are they burning?

    Also this is what those “magic color changing fire powder” pouches are. I got one and it did work.

  3. The copper sulfate (CuSO4) looks awesome, like it’s two toned. Or is that just reflection from green?

  4. Potassium Chloride | Lead Dinitrate | Barium Chloride | Copper Sulfate | Hydrogen Borate | Sodium Chloride | Strontium Chloride | Lithium Chloride

  5. I love this but it also belongs in /r/mildlyinfuriating for the line being crooked >:[ right side is higher than the left

  6. Dear teachers, do not do this as a demonstration in class. You ***always*** end up setting your students on fire. Just because you teach science doesn’t make you qualified to do this safely.

  7. This used to be a common demonstration in science classes. The compounds listed are metal chloride salts. In order to make them burn you soak them in a flammable liquid like methanol.

    Not shockingly having burning tubs of alcohol in shallow metal pans has led to horrific accidents numerous times. This demonstration is now frowned upon.

    Source: chemistry teacher

  8. And to think, people still burn logs instead of printed glossy magazines where they can enjoy all these splendid colors.

  9. The flames given off are for the positive ions only, so the chloride has nothing to do with the lithium chloride. The experiment is a test for positive ions. 🙂

  10. This reminds me of all the fun labs we got to do in my high school science classes through a program that my shithole state (AL) legislators defunded, and now I’m sad.

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