NASA identifies wind shear tearing apart Tropical Cyclone Liua


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IMAGE: OnSept. 28, 2018 at 0315 UTC (Sept 27 at 11: 15 p.m. EDT) MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite offered a noticeable picture of Tropical Depression Liua that revealed the …
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Credit: NASA/ NRL

Visible images from NASA’s Aqua satellite exposed that strong wind shear was negatively impacting Tropical Cyclone Liua in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

OnSept. 28 at 0315 UTC (Sept 27 at 11: 15 p.m. EDT) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite offered a noticeable picture of Tropical CycloneLiua Liua looked like a swirl of clouds around its center with the majority of its clouds and thunderstorms pressed southeast of center. Strong westerly to northwesterly vertical wind shear were tearing the storm apart.

In basic, wind shear is a step of how the speed and instructions of winds alter with elevation. Tropical cyclones resemble turning cylinders of winds. Each level has to be stacked on the top each other vertically in order for the storm to keep strength or heighten. Wind shear takes place when winds at various levels of the environment push versus the turning cylinder of winds, damaging the rotation by pressing it apart at various levels.

OnSept 28, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center released the last publication on Tropical CycloneLiua At that time, Liua was focused near 12.0 degrees south latitude and 161.1 degrees east longitude. That’s 540 miles northwest of Port Vila,Vanuatu Liua was moving gradually to the west-northwest and had optimal continual winds near 35 knots (40 miles per hour/62 kph).

Liua is anticipated to dissipate under negative climatic conditions.

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ByRob Gutro .

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center .

Disclaimer: We can make errors too. Have a good day.

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